JWST: Names, Claims and Attitudes

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Pat Izzo's photo: The Webb Telescope team posing with the full-scale model of the James Webb Space Telescope on the lawn at Goddard Space Flight Center, where it was displayed September 19-25, 2005. (September 2005) via Wikimedia Commons, used w/o permission.

NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI and Webb ERO Production Team's image from the James Webb Space Telescope. The Cartwheel galaxy group: Cartwheel Galaxy (ESO 350-40 / PGC 2248 / 2MASX J00374110-3342587 / ...) and smaller associated galaxies. Data from Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) (released August 2, 2022 by NASA)NASA launched the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) December 25, 2021.

By July of 2022, the JWST had settled into position at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point: about 1,500,000 kilometers, 930,000 miles from Earth.

Then, after deploying its heat shields and mirrors, the JWST started sending back remarkable images.1

And, even more remarkable, it was still called the James Webb Space Telescope. I've no idea why NASA didn't admit their mistake and submit an acceptable name. Particularly when 'everybody knows' that James Webb was one of THOSE people:

More at A Catholic Citizen in America.

The James Webb Space Telescope is still named after a NASA chief, despite protests. This week I talk about how America has changed since my youth. Except for how it hasn't.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Pax Romana: Augustus to Nero

Making a Connection

‘It is meaningless to preach at a funeral Mass if we don’t mention the resurrection of Christ.’ Sunday Reflections, 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C